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Overnight fire damages popular west side pizza place

Madison firefighters are investigating what led to a fire that caused major damage to a west side pizza restaurant early Friday morning. Madison police were sent to the Glass Nickel Pizza restaurant in the 5000 block of University Avenue for a burglar alarm going off about 3:45 a.m. Friday. When police arrived, they noticed smoke inside the building. Firefighters arrived to find smoke filling all the windows in the restaurant. They quickly found a significant fire inside the restaurant, which took about 20 minutes to knock down. Fire officials said the damage is contained to the restaurant. No other units inside the commercial strip mall were damaged by the fire. Investigators say the fire caused at least $100,000 in damage.

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 13:14:38 GMT

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Published: Tue, 10 May 2011 13:51:57 GMT

Sheriff: Man facing sixth OWI charge leads police on chase

The Dane County Sheriff’s Department has charged a Marshall man with his sixth offense of operating a vehicle while intoxicated following a 20-minute pursuit early Friday morning. Sheriff’s deputies tried to pull over a car driven by David Killerlain, 34, Friday around 12:15 a.m. near the corner of Town Hall Drive and Wisconsin Highway 19 in the Town of Sun Prairie. According to the Sheriff’s Department, Killerlain refused to pull over and led deputies on a pursuit that ended at Killerlain’s home in the Village of Marshall, where he was arrested. Killerlain was allegedly driving on a suspended driver’s license.

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 13:15:27 GMT

Hamilton's brings excitement to the Square

1. THE BACKSTORY: Josh Kregness grew up serving people from all walks of life. As the son of missionaries, Kregness learned to treat everyone with kindness. That service-oriented spirit has since led him to a successful career running local restaurants like the Library Café and Bar on campus and the Free House Pub in Middleton. Now he’s going solo as owner of Hamilton’s on the Square. 2. THE VIBE: The space is in a sandstone building from 1867 (formerly the Blue Marlin) that has been restored to feel both modern and cozy. The building itself is on the Register of Historic Places and housed a meat market from the late 1880s until 1941. Patio seating gives you a lovely view of the Capitol, which Kregness says never gets old. 3. THE FOOD: Hamilton’s is an American restaurant with approachable fine dining. Kregness says being on the Capitol Square means it’s paramount to be hyper-local. From lunch until late night, items like the duck French dip are conversation starters. 4. THE MUST-TRY: The menu changes often, but the lamb chops remain a favorite—they’re served medium rare and big on the bone with roasted turnips and a minted yogurt sauce. Go for the pub’s signature cocktail, the Peter Rabbit. It’s concocted with Pimm’s No. 1, local basil, fresh-squeezed lemon and cane syrup and presented with a pickled carrot and basil leaf. 5. THE BOTTOM LINE: Hamilton’s adds new excitement to a corner of the Square that could use more foot traffic. “I’ve been so blessed with all of our neighbors being very supportive,” says Kregness. “We’re just trying to pull people this way.” video

Published: Wed, 10 Feb 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Two accused of setting 4-year-old on fire

Two relatives face charges after a four-year-old girl was badly burned.

Published: Wed, 10 Feb 2016 20:47:15 GMT

Meet the Pet of the Week: Noelle

Noelle is available for adoption from the Dane County Humane Society. The tiny puppy was found with a broken leg in December but has healed and is ready for a home.

Published: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 18:33:33 GMT

Clinton, Sanders exchange blows on Obama at debate

Hillary Clinton wants Bernie Sanders to know she's got President Barack Obama's back. Much of the debate lacked the bitterness of earlier forums as Clinton and Sanders laid out differences on policy questions. But the confrontation during the PBS "NewsHour" Democratic debate simulcast on CNN flared into open anger in the final moments. Clinton accused her rival of not standing with Obama after he endorsed a book by CNN contributor Bill Press critical of the president. She said Sanders had called Obama "weak" and a "disappointment" in the past and she warned "the kind of criticism that we heard from Sen. Sanders about our president, I expect from Republicans. I do not expect (it) from someone running for the Democratic nomination to succeed President Obama." Sanders was furious: "Madam Secretary, that is a low blow." He insisted Obama was his friend, but that did not mean that a senator had to agree with the president on everything. "One of us ran against President Obama," Sanders said, responding to Clinton's 2008 showdown against the then-Illinois senator. "I was not that candidate." One of the biggest moments of the night came when Sanders warned Clinton: "You are not in the White House yet." The debate was the first time the rivals met since Sanders won the New Hampshire primary in a 20 point victory on Tuesday. Obama's legacy The issue of Obama's legacy is an important one because his approval ratings among Democrats remains high. And on a day in which she won the endorsement of the political arm of the Congressional Black Caucus, Clinton, who is desperate to slow the surging Sanders after his Granite State triumph, seemed to be reaching out for African-American voters in South Carolina --- a key state in her southern firewall. Both candidates made strenuous efforts to show they appreciate economic and social problems afflicting African-American communities. "An African-American baby born today stands a one in four chance of ending up in jail," Sanders said. "That is beyond unspeakable," he added. He went on to say that race relations would "absolutely" be better under his administration than in Obama's tenure. Sanders also called for overhauls in sentencing, and a "radical reform" of a system that he said has turned into a vicious circle that disproportionately cycles African-American males in and out of jail. Clinton said that under Obama there had been a "lot of advances" that had helped African-Americans but warned that thanks to social media "we are seeing the dark side of the remaining systemic racism that we have to root out in our society." There was also a spirited exchange between Clinton and Sanders over foreign policy as she sought to drive home an argument that only she has the qualities demanded of a commander-in-chief. Sanders revived his attack on Clinton's 2002 vote to authorize the Iraq War to argue that judgement -- not experience -- is most important in a commander in chief. Clinton hit back that a vote 14 years ago does not equate to a plan to destroy ISIS in 2016. Henry Kissinger Then Sanders, the former 1960s student activist, took an unexpected swipe against Clinton for taking the advice of Henry Kissinger, one of her Republican predecessors as secretary of state, who is reviled by many liberals for his role in wars and political unrest in Vietnam, Cambodia, Indonesia and South America. "She talked about getting the approval or the support or the mentoring of Henry Kissinger. Now, I find it rather amazing, because I happen to believe that Henry Kissinger was one of the most destructive secretaries of state in the modern history of this country," Sanders said. "I am proud to say that Henry Kissinger is not my friend." Clinton responded with one of her most cutting lines of the night, playing on a complaint among her supporters that he is weak on foreign policy and is unwilling to disclose who is advising him on national security. "Well, I know journalists have asked who you do listen to on foreign policy, and we have yet to know who that is," Clinton said. The rivals also made a pitch for the Latino community, which will play a key role in the next Democratic nominating contest in Nevada on February 20. They backed Obama's executive actions to defer deportations of up to five million undocumented immigrants. Both said they would go further. Clinton pointed out that Sanders had voted against an ultimately failed bid to pass comprehensive immigration reform in Congress in 2007 while she voted for it. Sanders explained that he had done so because guest worker provisions under the legislation were described by one legal advocacy group as "akin to slavery." There were also heated exchanges after Sanders slammed Clinton over super PACs supporting her campaign. He has argued that the fact that Clinton accepts contributions from financial groups means she is less likely to take on Wall Street in office. Clinton countered that despite accepting such donations in 2008, Obama passed tough new regulations on the financial industry early in his administration and she would do the same. 'People are not dumb' Sanders retorted: "Let's not insult the intelligence of the American people. ...People are not dumb." Clinton sought to dent Sanders by portraying his plans as unrealistic and said it was important for Americans to vet both of their programs. At one point, Clinton told him, "We are not France," after Sanders had complained that the United States was the only major industrialized power in the world that did not provide universal health care for its citizens. "We should not make promises we can't keep," Clinton said and warned that Sanders' plans to push for a single-payer health care program would gridlock the political system and jeopardize Obamacare. Clinton sought to co-opt the language that Sanders has been using to refer to an economy he says rewards the rich at the expense of the middle class. "Yes, the economy is rigged in favor of those at the top," Clinton said. "I know a lot of Americans are angry at the economy and for good cause. Americans haven't had a raise in 15 years," Clinton said, adding that she wanted to do more to ensure that "Wall Street never wrecks Main Street again."

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 06:27:48 GMT

Major sports complex in Fitchburg likely, if city chips in

An Indiana company is hoping to build a multimillion-dollar sports complex in Fitchburg, but wants the city to help fund it. "It’s a 400-acre development. We are in control of 200 acres and the project will eventually be home to 4,000 people and 2,000 employees,” said Chris Armstrong, president of Avante Properties. Armstrong said a recently proposed sports complex by GK Sports and Entertainment is exactly what is needed to set the “Up-Town” Fitchburg development, located near Highway 14 and Lacy Road, in motion. "It will have 12 indoor basketball courts, two indoor soccer fields, two sheets of ice one with seats around it so it could hold concerts and minor league sports teams,” Armstrong said. With the complex built, developers believe hotels, restaurants and retails sites would follow. "It would create an entertainment district essentially overnight,” Armstorng said. The sports complex is set to cost $77 million , but GK sports wants the city to fund $25 million of that, through tax increment financing. Something Fitchburg’s Mayor isn't keen on, yet. "Right now we're not at that point we're more like trying to find the middle ground, where something that works for them and something that works for the citizens of Fitchburg,” said Mayor Steve Arnold, of Fitchburg. Barkelar is interested in seeing how his view will change. He just doesn’t believe the city should be involved. "I don't think they should invest millions into a private business. The business people can pay their own way,” he said. The developer believes asking Fitchburg to pay for a portion of the complex is justified, because the development will likely bring in millions of dollars to the city.

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 13:26:08 GMT

Man who died in Green Bay workplace forklift accident ID'ed

Authorities have released the name of a man who died in a forklift accident at a Green Bay trucking company earlier this week. The Brown County medical examiner identifies the man as 59-year-old Peter Bulkowski of Krakow. Bulkowski died at Venture Logistics Monday afternoon. Preliminary autopsy results confirm he died of injuries suffered in the workplace accident. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration is investigating along with Green Bay police.

Published: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 21:21:05 GMT

Judge questions insanity verdict in homicide case

A Dane County judge is questioning an insanity verdict for a former Dane County deputy who admitted to killing his wife and sister-in-law. Former Dane County Deputy Andrew Steele has been at Mendota Mental Health since last May after he was committed to the Department of Health Services for causing the deaths of his wife, Ashlee Steele, and Kacee Tollefsbol in Fitchburg in August 2014. He was found not guilty by reason of mental defect in the deaths. His defense argued that a neurological disorder -- Lou Gehrig's disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS -- is what caused Steele to shoot and kill the two women.  "I'm not second guessing myself, and I'm absolutely not second guessing a jury or the honesty or integrity of lawyers or professional witnesses," Judge Nicholas McNamara said. "Andy Steele does not have this condition, he never did." McNamara was supposed to decide Thursday afternoon if Steele will stay at Mendota or be released, but he said Thursday night he would not be making a decision. Steele's attorneys said his condition has deteriorated since he was committed and Mendota may soon not be able to care for him. Two doctors testified Thursday that Steele is no longer a risk as he is on a feeding tube and may soon be put on a ventilator, but family members of Ashlee Steele and Kacee Tollefsbol said releasing him will still present a danger to his children. "There has been no justice for the deaths of Ashlee and Kacee. I had to say goodbye to my sisters in a coffin because of that man. Six innocent kids had to say goodbye to their mother because of that man," said Brad Putnam, Ashlee and Kacee's brother. The judge said he has 90 days, but will not take that long to make his decision.

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 13:13:49 GMT

Officials ID Baraboo woman killed in crash with semi

A 70-year-old Baraboo woman was killed in a two-vehicle crash involving a semitrailer in Sauk County Wednesday, officials said. Emergency crews were sent to Highway 33 about, one-half mile east of County Road T, around 12:35 p.m. for reports of a crash where there were serious injuries, according to a release. Officers said the two vehicles, a Nissan Maxima and a Kenworth semi, were going east on Highway 33 with the semi behind the Maxima. The Maxima pulled off the highway and completed a U turn into the path of the semi, according to the release. The driver of the semi, a 72-year-old Reeseville man, was not able to stop. The driver of the Maxima, 70-year-old Christine Collins, was pronounced dead at the scene, officials said. The crash is still under investigation. Officials said drugs, alcohol and issues with the highway do not appear to be factors in the crash.

Published: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 22:22:23 GMT

Civil suit filed by man attacked for trespassing

A hunter who was beaten after wandering onto private property in Pepin County is suing his attacker. Kevin Elberg, 44, spent 10 days in jail and was ordered to serve two years of probation for misdemeanor battery in the November 2014 attack on Sao Vang. Prosecutors said Elberg severely beat Vang after Vang was found on land owned by Elberg's father. The civil suit seeks a judgment from a jury.

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 12:41:06 GMT

2 pedestrians hit in 2 separate crosswalks, police say

Two pedestrians were injured in separate incidents in which they were hit by a vehicle while crossing the street on Madison’s near west side Thursday, officials said. The first incident happened around 8:40 a.m. on Regent Street near Allen Street, according to a release. A woman told police the sun obscured her vision as her car hit a 59-year-old woman in a crosswalk, police said. The 59-year-old woman was taken to a hospital with a broken leg, according to a release. The driver was cited for failure to yield. The second incident happened around 9:20 a.m. at the intersection of University Avenue and Highland Avenue, police said. A 64-year-old woman was taken to a hospital with possible broken ribs after being hit by a car in a crosswalk, according to the release. The driver, an 80-year-old man, was cited for failure to yield. He was turning east onto University Avenue from Highland Avenue when he hit the woman, police said.

Published: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 22:19:09 GMT

Federal officials say a Milwaukee man has been convicted of transporting an underage girl from Madison, Wisconsin, to the Chicago area to engage in prostitution. A news release from the U.S. attorney's office for the northern district of Illinois says a jury convicted 32-year-old Dajuan Key on Thursday on one count of knowingly transporting a minor from Wisconsin to Illinois to engage in prostitution. The release says Key brought the 15-year-old girl to the Chicago area in September 2013, forced her to engage in commercial sex acts and kept the money. According to the release, evidence at trial showed Key encountered the girl online. The release says she was rescued by Romeoville police on Sept. 10, 2013, and Key was arrested. A sentencing hearing is scheduled for May 23.

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 13:31:27 GMT

Judge questions insanity verdict in homicide case

A Dane County judge is questioning an insanity verdict for a former Dane County deputy who admitted to killing his wife and sister-in-law. Former Dane County Deputy Andrew Steele has been at Mendota Mental Health since last May after he was committed to the Department of Health Services for causing the deaths of his wife, Ashlee Steele, and Kacee Tollefsbol in Fitchburg in August 2014. He was found not guilty by reason of mental defect in the deaths. His defense argued that a neurological disorder -- Lou Gehrig's disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS -- is what caused Steele to shoot and kill the two women.  "I'm not second guessing myself, and I'm absolutely not second guessing a jury or the honesty or integrity of lawyers or professional witnesses," Judge Nicholas McNamara said. "Andy Steele does not have this condition, he never did." McNamara was supposed to decide Thursday afternoon if Steele will stay at Mendota or be released, but he said Thursday night he would not be making a decision. Steele's attorneys said his condition has deteriorated since he was committed and Mendota may soon not be able to care for him. Two doctors testified Thursday that Steele is no longer a risk as he is on a feeding tube and may soon be put on a ventilator, but family members of Ashlee Steele and Kacee Tollefsbol said releasing him will still present a danger to his children. "There has been no justice for the deaths of Ashlee and Kacee. I had to say goodbye to my sisters in a coffin because of that man. Six innocent kids had to say goodbye to their mother because of that man," said Brad Putnam, Ashlee and Kacee's brother. The judge said he has 90 days, but will not take that long to make his decision.

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 13:13:49 GMT

Walker to sign bill Friday changing civil service

Gov. Scott Walker plans Friday to sign a Republican-backed bill to overhaul Wisconsin's civil service system. Walker's office says the GOP governor is scheduled to sign the bill into law at Manpower Group in Appleton. The bill eliminates job applicant exams, centralizes hiring decisions within the governor's administration, does away with bumping rights that have protected more experienced workers from losing their jobs and allows agencies to keep new hires on probation for up to two years. The bill also defines just cause for termination and lists infractions that would result in immediate firing. Democrats contend the bill will open the door to cronyism within state agencies. Walker has been outspoken in his support of the proposal.

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 00:36:58 GMT

PD: Woman attacks 2 other women in separate incidents at laundromat

A 53-year-old Madison woman was arrested Wednesday for allegedly attacking two people inside a laundromat Tuesday night, according to a release. Nancy G. Prince allegedly assaulted a 25-year-old woman and a 30-year-old while they were doing their laundry in the 1800 block of South Park Street, officials said. The attacks happened about 50 minutes apart. The 25-year-old was punched in the head and knocked to the ground, according to the release. She fought back before running from the building. The 30-year-old woman was tackled and her head hit the tiles on the floor extremely hard, police said. She showed signs of a concussion, and told police the attacker held two her hands over her mouth while pinning her to the floor. Descriptions from the victims led police to arrest Prince Wednesday night on Beld Street, according to the release. Police said Prince claimed the victims called her names, which is why she attacked them.

Published: Thu, 11 Feb 2016 20:41:46 GMT

Lake Mills residents show love for trees slated for removal

Lake Mills residents affixed hearts to show affection for decades-old trees along Main Street set to be removed in the spring of 2018. That's when the street, which carries Highway 89 through the Jefferson County town, is set to be widened. The widening will require nearly all of the trees along the road to be cut down, Lake Mills City Manager Steve Wilke said. "In the tree terrace, there's virtually no trees that are going to survive," Wilke said. Wilke said the Wisconsin Department of Transportation will partially compensate the city so it can install new trees along Main Street. The new trees, which will grow to be smaller than the originals, are supposed to bloom each spring. Wilke hopes this can turn into a tourist attraction. "Being able to drive a mile and a half of a stretch of a roadway with all these blooming trees in the spring would make people drive down and look at it," Wilke said. "Maybe like the cherry blossoms in Washington or some of the things that go on in Door County." Some residents have voiced displeasure over the impending tree removal. "I think it's a horrible plan to remove them. The road has been this way for so long," Lake Mills resident Natalie Wollin said. "I don't think there's any reason why we need to expand the road." Wollin said the hearts show her "that people still care about things like nature and it's not all about the hustle and bustle of things." She said she'll miss the historic trees. "Most of these trees have been around a lot longer than the residents in this town," Wollin said. "It would be really sad to see them go." Wilke said Lake Mills remains committed to its trees. "We have been a Tree City," Wilke said. "We look at them from the perspective of what they add to the community as far as culture, what they add to community as far as controlling ambient temperatures in the streets, reducing pollution, and all the other types of things." A Tree City is a designation given to municipalities by the National Arbor Day Foundation that meet standards set by the organization. The city's website has a rendering of its new Main Street as well as other documents related to the construction project.

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 02:34:08 GMT

Weekend 608: "Stomp," Winter Festivals & more

Thursday, February 11 The UW–Madison Dance Department continues “Rule of Three,” a faculty concert featuring the original choreography of guest artist Heidi Latsky and six contemporary dance works by UW–Madison artists Kate Corby, Karen McShane-Hellenbrand, Li Chiao-Ping, Marlene Skog, Chris Walker and Jin-Wen Yu. Feb. 11-13, dance.wisc.edu Using unconventional percussives to create explosive rhythms, the eight performers of “Stomp” bring their inventive beats to Overture Center. Feb. 11-14, overturecenter.org Head to the Majestic Theatre for the second annual “Winterjam Salute to the Grateful Dead.” Wisconsin’s Dead tribute band, the New Speedway Players, takes the stage, along with the Evergreen Grass Band and Flowpoetry. Feb. 11, majesticmadison.com Friday, February 12 Kanopy Dance welcomes guest arts Pascal Rioult and Joyce Herring, both former Martha Graham principal dancers, who bring their expertise and Rioult New York dancers for an evening of romantic duets and dark masterworks. Featuring choreography from Kanopy’s Lisa Thurrell and Robert E. Cleary, this Valentine’s weekend show uses dance to explore love in “Rioult: Hearts Entwined” at Overture Center. Feb. 12-14, kanopydance.org The Madison Symphony Orchestra presents a Valentine’s weekend concert called “Music, The Food of Love…” at Overture Center. The program includes works from Tchaikovsky, Ravel and Beethoven. Guest Conductor Daniel Hege joins the MSO, along with violinist Alina Ibragimova. Feb. 12-14, madisonsymphony.org Whether you know him from “Arrested Development,” “Mr. Show” or his prolific stand-up career, Emmy-winning comedian David Cross stops by Madison for his “Making America Great Again!” comedy tour. Feb. 12, madisonorpheum.com OUT!cast Theatre and Mercury Players bring one of the most beloved cult classics to the stage for “The Rocky Horror Show” at the Bartell Theatre. Filled with wacky characters, outlandish plots and all your favorite “Time Warp” and “Touch Me” tunes, see Rocky Horror in a brand new way. Feb. 12-27, mercuryplayerstheatre.com Mixing the ’60s beach craze with the psychological thriller genre, Charles Busch’s comedy “Psycho Beach Party” tells a twisted tale of surf, sand and psychopathy. StageQ brings the show to the Bartell Theatre. Feb. 12-27, stageq.com Saturday, February 13 It’s thrills and chills galore at the Madison Winter Festival. At this annual event, the inside lanes of the Capitol Square are dedicated to family-friendly activities such as ice sculpting, sled rides, snowshoeing and more. Other popular events throughout the weekend include cross-country ski races, the Frosty 5K run and walk, the Frosty 1 Mile Dog Jog and the Cyclo Frost Cyclocross Race. Feb. 13-14, winter-fest.com The Wisconsin Historical Museum gives the state the star treatment with “Wisconsin Goes Hollywood.” This exhibit highlights Wisconsinites who have made it big in Hollywood through displays of photos and costumes, along with examples of how Wisconsin has been portrayed on television and in pop culture. Standouts include the jacket Chris Farley wore in Black Sheep and the Racine Bells baseball uniform from A League of their Own. Through Feb. 13, historicalmuseum.wisconsinhistory.org Sunday, February 14 The top of the Madison Children’s Museum is the place to be for the Rooftop Icicle Festival. Kids can eat flavored snow, skate on the toddler ice rink, make snow art and more. Feb. 14, madisonchildrensmuseum.org Spend your Valentine’s Day supporting a great cause. The United Way Bluegrass Benefit at the Barrymore Theatre brings six acts—Sortin’ the Mail, Stillhouse Six, Dave Ladau, Madfiddle & Highway 151, Oak Street Ramblers and Old Tin Can String Band—to the stage, with proceeds going to the United Way of Dane County. Feb. 14, barrymorelive.com Bring a date to the Valentine’s Day Cabaret at the Majestic. Led by Davina Sowers on vocals and piano, Davina and the Vegabonds is a jazzy quintet influenced by blues music and old standards. Feb. 14, majesticmadison.com The “Valentine’s Day Love Affair” at the High Noon Saloon showcases the talents of Kinfolk and DJ Pain 1, two standouts in the local R&B and hip-hop scenes. Feb. 14, high-noon.com VIDEO

Published: Wed, 10 Feb 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Stroke survivor helps Stroke Camp with bowling fundraiser

Four years ago Gary Zuege’s life changed when he suffered a stroke while working at the restaurant he owns, The Owl’s Nest Supper Club. He spent 20 days in the hospital and struggled to deal with the changes to his life. The stroke took from Zuege the ability to always find the words to communicate as he had. One phrase that he says often, though, is, “good days, bad days.” While the stroke certainly brought with it a share of bad days, Zuege found many good days when he found the Stroke Camp. The annual camp helps survivors of strokes learn to deal with the change. It also helps the caregivers. “The biggest thing is we want the stroke patients that are out there and their caregivers to know, they aren’t alone,” Zuege's daughter, Kelly Zuege, said. Gary Zuege, who was reluctant to go to the Stroke Camp three years ago, now cherishes the memories he’s made at there. “That’s a good day,” Zuege said. The camp made such an impact on Zuege’s life he decided to do something so that others could get the same chance he did. He and his family created a bowling fundraiser for Stroke Camp. Because Zuege also benefited and found many “good days” from a rescue dog he adopted, the family decided to give some of the money raised to the Golden Rule Rescue and Rehabilitation. This Saturday they will hold the third annual Dogs Strike 4 Strokes at Dream Lanes in Madison. The 8 Pin Tap Tournament will offer two shifts, one at noon and another at 2 p.m. The cost to participate is $15 per person and $45 per three-person team. Based on 60 teams, first place will be $225.

Published: Fri, 12 Feb 2016 02:40:53 GMT